Renting guide

According to the Office of Nation Statistics 36% of households in England and Wales were rented rather than owner-occupied. Being a tenant is widely accepted as a viable alternative to home ownership, particularly among those who may not yet be willing or able to consider buying a permanent home. Renting a property should be an enjoyable experience and for those who are new to the process this renting guide will explain what to look out for with these 10 renting property tips.

1. Preparing your finances

Decide how much you can reasonably afford to pay in rent each month. Take into account your general costs of living and the fact that you will be paying council Tax as well as fuel bills, contents insurance, TV licence and broadband. There will be some costs associated with applying to take a tenancy for such things as referencing and preparation of the tenancy agreement. In addition, you will need to budget at least six weeks’ rent as the amount to be put down as security deposit for the length of the tenancy.

2. Finding a suitable property to rent

Search for properties in areas that you want to live in.  Remember that the rental market is usually fast-moving and that good properties in popular areas don’t stay on the market for very long. If you see something that may suit your needs, get your skates on and quickly go and see it. 

3. Asking questions

When you find a property that you would like to rent, you will most probably have read about it online or in an agent’s printed details. You will have seen only basic information, so if there is anything that is unclear or not stated don’t be afraid to ask questions. For example, check who is responsible for maintaining the garden, and whether there are any restrictions concerning pets or smoking in the premises. If you clear such questions at the earliest stage you won’t waste money applying to rent an unsuitable property. Don’t hesitate to ask the letting agent for a list of all the charges that you may incur throughout the process of applying to rent the property.

4. The application process

Having found a suitable property through a letting agent, you will be asked to pay over a holding deposit (sometimes called an administration fee) which secures the property in your name while the preliminary formalities take place. Check if the holding deposit is refundable if the tenancy does not go ahead for any reason. The agent will now process your application on behalf of their landlord client and find out if you are going to be a suitable tenant. This will involve credit checks, enquiring about details of your employment, taking up references (especially from any previous landlord who you rented from) and making sure you have the right to reside in the UK. Check with the agent what costs are involved.

5. The tenancy agreement

Assuming you pass the checks and referencing process, the agent will draw up an Assured Shorthold Tenancy agreement for signing by you and the landlord. Read the agreement very carefully before signing and if you are unsure of anything don’t hesitate to ask for clarification. The tenancy agreement is a legal document and binds you and the landlord to the terms within it. Make sure they are in accordance with your understanding.

6. The deposit

You will be required to pay a security deposit that will be held by the agent on behalf of the landlord for the duration of the tenancy. Its purpose is to provide the landlord with compensation if you damage the property or its contents. Fair wear and tear is excluded from these dilapidation's. All deposits in assured shorthold tenancies must be registered with one of the government-approved tenancy deposit schemes that. The deposit scheme will also provide a dispute resolution service if, at the end of the tenancy, you cannot agree the amount charged by the landlord or their agent for the dilapidation's.

7. Inventories

Even if the property is being let unfurnished, it is really important to have a properly prepared and comprehensively detailed inventory, which is carefully reviewed and signed by tenant and landlord. It will list any existing faults in the property such as areas of damaged decoration, marks on carpets or chips in bath enamel. This ensures that when the dilapidation's are assessed at the end of the tenancy you will not be charged for those that were in the property when you took it over. A good inventory will include photographs of such faults. 

8. Paying the rent

You will probably be paying the monthly rent by standing order to the landlord or their agent. Always ensure that rent is paid on time and in full. Non-payment of rent is a serious matter that can end up in court. If there is any problem with the property, do not withhold payment of the rent. Such an action is guaranteed to make resolution all the more difficult and puts you in breach of the terms of the tenancy agreement. It can also show up in future referencing checks and might cause problems if you come to rent another property.

9. At the end of the tenancy

When the tenancy period is nearing its end, you can ask if the landlord will agree to renew the tenancy (the amount of the rent may change and there may be some administration charges to pay) or you can leave the property. Arrange to move out by the agreed time on the agreed day. Make sure the property is clean and tidy and in at least the same condition as when you moved in. On the moving day, the inventory should be checked at the property by the landlord or their agent, with you in attendance, and it should be signed off by you as correct before you vacate. Take a note of the meter readings for gas and electricity and apply for final billing. Don’t forget to arrange with Royal Mail to redirect mail to your new address (ensure the redirection is specifically for mail in your name).

10. Repaying your deposit

 

Shortly after you move out, you will receive an account from the landlord or their agent detailing the charges for dilapidation's, if any, that you agreed when the inventory was reviewed during the check-out. Providing you agree the amounts, the balance of your deposit should be returned without delay.